SharePoint Large File Library Via Windows Explorer – Error

This is a post moved over from my old blog — still relevant.

Recently, I had the opportunity to take a look at an issue with accessing SharePoint file libraries through Windows Explorer UNC shares.  When those file libraries have HUGE numbers of files, the client will hang for upwards of five minutes and then error out with the following error:

“[\\UNCLocation\] is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if you have access permissions.  A device attached to the system is not functioning.”

Frustrating right?

Before I get to the fix, lets review the why.  When you open a folder on a Windows system (remote or local), the system has to do a couple of things:

  1. Obtain a listing of all the objects in the folder.
  2. Pull the attributes for every file.
  3. Display the files.

Well, in this case, the number of files pushes the limit of the attributes that the Windows system can load at one time due to restrictions put in place to prevent Denial of Service attacks on WebDAV Clients.  This can also happen when you are downloading VERY LARGE single files due to the same type of restrictions.

The Fix:

For Large File Libraries:

  1. Open Regedit & Go Here: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\WebClient\Parameters\
  2. Edit the “FileAttributesLimitInBytes” value from 1000000 to 20000000

For Opening Large Files:

  1. Open Regedit & Go Here: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\WebClient\Parameters\
  2. Edit the “FileSizeLimitInBytes” value to anything larger than the file you intend to download.  The default value is 50000000.

FIGHT! The VMware vs. Hyper-V Debate Continues

Year over year, the debate continues.  Even after I write this blog post, the debate will continue.  VMware vs. Hyper-V.  The truth is that both hypervisors have their advantages and disadvantages.  To start with, let’s take a look at the prominent ones.

VMware Advantages

  • Thin hypervisor with a tiny install that can be run on a SD card.
  • FAST live migration (vMotion). This allows you to perform maintenance operations faster, without downtime.
  • Memory isolation. This is critical to prevent VM memory errors from crashing the hypervisor and vice versa.
  • Streamlined automatic dynamic memory management and transparent page sharing allowing for better consolidation ratios – to the tune +25-50% more VMs per host. It is important to note that Hyper-V does support dynamic memory management with manual configuration when all the VMs and hypervisor are on the same patch level.
  • No downtime needed to clone a VM.
  • Storage IO Control (SIOC) which is necessary to optimize storage access to VMs!
  • Dynamic serial and parallel ports.
  • Virtual Volumes & VSAN!
  • Direct driver capabilities which allow for a shorter IO path and better overall VM performance.
  • Overall better Linux, Unix, and Mac guest level support.
  • Anti-Virus offload. This is critical for VDI based deployments and helps to reduce/eliminate AV impacts to underlying disk; though we will see how this shakes out with NSX.
  • Overall Hot Add/Remove support for memory, NICs, CPUs, and disks.
  • Unified web based management through vCenter.

Hyper-V Advantages

  • Native storage support for ODX at the hypervisor level by default.
  • Network bandwidth, capping, and reservations are more flexible than Network IO Control.
  • Native clustering without central management system like vCenter.
  • Native HA without central management system like vCenter.
  • Native live migration without central management system like vCenter.

 

Really, what we have are two hypervisors that are fairly equal in basic day to day feature sets if you don’t care about consolidation ratios, high performance, and can suffer downtime to perform a large majority of management tasks – with Hyper-V.  So, if you can survive that…  Cost.

  • Hyper-V is free!  This is the one major thing that I ALWAYS hear from Hyper-V fans.  But is it really?  Hyper-V is included as part of the Windows OS – great.  Let’s not forget that VMware provides ESXi for free as well.  Granted, with the free ESXi hypervisor,  you won’t have the native cluster, HA, or Live Migration.  Also, with VMware, you do get better consolidation ratios, so you will save on the overall hardware costs since you can potentially fit more VMs on a single host.  This may not be a great thing on a single server, but if you can fit 5 Hyper-V server’s worth of VMs on a three node cluster of ESXi servers – the low cost that you pay for a base vSphere Essentials license is more than covered for in the hardware savings alone.
  • The Hyper-V management interface for a Hyper-V cluster consists of a disparate set of tools.  You need to use Failover Cluster Manager, Hyper-V Manager, and other tools just to perform basic administration tasks.  Even with SCVMM – which you will pay $10K+ for, you still can’t do full centralized management.  In a VMware environment, if I want to clone a template and spin up a VM – I am talking less than 5 minutes by clicking a wizard and assigning the customization template.  With Hyper-V I have to go through a myriad of steps that waste 20 minutes of time.  If I have to deploy 10 machines, that is no longer 50 minutes as it might be with VMware – but a total of 200 minutes with Hyper-V.  Take that across all the disconnected management tasks required and you are talking an operational cost increase of around 300% in man hours PLUS a 300% increase in maintenance windows potentially which will impact mission critical business functions.

 

I suppose if all you care about is the CAPEX cost and don’t really care about on-going OPEX costs, extended outage windows, and really feel like adding additional servers to handle your VM load while increasing power and cooling costs – well then Hyper-V is free.  VMware is not cheap, and admittedly you do have to pay for add-ons, up to a point.  Also, with VMware, the cost is upfront and renewed for support w/upgrade rights yearly (same for Hyper-V on the support if you want it).  If all you need is the basics, they both work.  If you know Hyper-V and feel like scripting PowerShell for automation, then it is quite capable.  But don’t ever tell me it is free.  Remember you mother probably told that there is nothing in this world for free – so why should you think Hyper-V is?

 

Now, I am not saying Hyper-V is bad.  But I would not use it for mission critical applications where my job depended on it.  Not yet anyway.  There may come a day.  For now, it is relegated to the lab.

Load Balancing Exchange 2013 With Citrix NetScaler 11

Today, I am publishing a small guide written and intended to be used as a starting point for Load Balancing Microsoft Exchange 2013 via Citrix NetScaler 11 Build 64.34 and newer with the following expectations:

  • Provide Load Balancing (LB) to all Exchange services.
  • Provide ActiveSync Kerberos Constrained Delegation to function with iPhone, iPad (iOS Configuration Utility or AirWatch), Android (TouchDown Mail Client or AirWatch), or Windows Phone (AirWatch).
  • Provide service monitors that are in line with Microsoft best practices.
  • Provide all Exchange services via Content Switching Services (CSS) to only use one IP address.
  • Utilize responder and rewrite policies and actions to automatically redirect unsecured and root URL connections.
  • All communication from the client through to the Exchange 2013 servers will be secured.

I hope that this will be a help to the Citrix NetScaler community as a whole.  Thanks go to Rafyel G. Brooks who published a guide back in 2014 on how to deploy ActiveSync with KCD.  This guide resolves some issues with the configuration with the new NetScalers and expands on it to encompass the entire Exchange 2013 Load Balancing scenario.

Here It Is: NS11-Exchange2013-KCD-ActiveSync-Deployment

Please Enjoy!